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Doing nothing all day long


#21

I know that feeling. You get so hopeful, you’re happy they finally seem to “get it”, then the whole bottom falls out your world.

Does he say he will take them? or is he outright refusing?

I feel like our positions are reversed - just a few months ago, your son was doing well on the shots & mine was either outright refusing the meds or lying about taking them. It’s a good remind of how quickly things can change either way.

At least if he does end up back in the hospital, you know they’ll most likely put him back on the shots & that would be good. You were asking about whether or not you could give them yourself, and not that I’ve seen them, I bet you could. We had to give our cat intramuscular shots before - the only problem was she was skin and bones at the time.

I also took some shots like that at home before - a long time ago. I gave some to myself in my thigh with an insulin needle. The ones that had to go deeper, a family member gave me - it wasn’t hard at all.

I’m not going that route (my son already said he could probably give himself one) because I want him as connected as possible to this treatment program.


#22

Have you tried giving him sarcosine?


#23

He says they make him depressed but his doctor told him that was not a side effect of Zyprexa. Yes he is taking Sarcosine each morning. Thanks for the reminder.


#24

That sounds awful, listening for the helicopter above looking for your son. It’s the most horrible thing to go through, isn’t it? And I can relate to “this will only be over when I die.” I feel like things are getting better every month, for him, and so that makes my life better as well. I still feel I have some PTSD or something from that terrible week. I’m constantly waiting for the sky to fall, if you know what I mean. Kind of jumpy and I over analyze everything. Just need to let it go.

I live on the west coast. You?

You hang in there too. I appreciate your feedback so much. My favorite quote of the month right now, and I read it often, is: Stop being afraid of what could go wrong and start being positive about what could go right.

Take care.


#25

Been there - my son said Zyprexa made him feel so numb he couldn’t enjoy anything, not even music anymore. Maybe that’s what he means by depressed?

I think that is a side effect - I’ve read quite a few people say they can’t feel anything when they’re on it.

I ask a million questions - or try to - when he says something like that so I know exactly what he means as close as I can. He gets aggravated with me for pretty much interrogating him when he doesn’t want to talk about it, but I ask everyone a tone of questions.


#26

I wish I could just put this answer on one forum and let everyone see it. My son has had SZ for the last 13 years, He tried to commit suicide on 6 Dec last year -despite religiously taking all the meds he just couldn’t stand his life anymore. On about 13 Dec I found the answer in a book called Niacin the real story. He has been 3 weeks on niacin and vit c - was discharged by the astounded doctors 2 days ago and is no longer hearing voices - a new man with a second change at life. Get the book and read it !
The meds are so horrific no wonder these poor kids don’t want to take them - i believe it was a drug called amisulpride that was directly responsible for him trying to take his own life Do you know what it does ? It reduces dopamine so much that there is no joy or motivation left in life. Why would even you or I want to go on and then mixed with something that makes you droll like an animal and makes you shake and be constipated ! Come on…


#27

My son is the same. Won’t go anywhere and has nothing to do but won’t participate in the social drop-in group. He is also on a depot once per month of Invega Sustenna. They pick him up for his shot and bring him back. He lives with his dad. We’re divorced. I live about 15 minutes away with my fiancé. He is very quiet and doesn’t cling, so I haven’t had your experience. However, his dad does leave for a couple months in winter and then also the summer. My daughter lives there too and her and


#28

her twins toddlers (my sweeties) live there too so he doesn’t live alone. I take the opportunity while the ex is away to spend the night sometimes which is fun for me :grin: and the twins love it. So do son and daughter. It’s not as idyllic as it sounds, however, because it’s so sad to see him so alone. And being with the twin (a boy and a girl) makes me remember him at that age …


#29

My son has been on the shot for four years now and he’s still not going out. I’m glad he isn’t psychotic. But I think the negative symptoms are so sad. Can you ask his doctor what he/she thinks? I’m of the mind I don’t want to rock the boat! I’m afraid of a med change unless it’s absolutely necessary because I know he will not take a pill!


#30

That’s a lovely quote Julie Ann, I think could be good for all of us, for our survival mechanism maybe.

You hang in there too. I’m in the Uk, North East of England.


#31

Im similar ss I think the depot has changed our lives is some aspects and frightened that changing meds could set us back.


#32

@Jane57 My son was like that in the beginning. He wouldn’t go anywhere. Only to the doctor and back home. Now, that he’s on his medication and been stable. On some days, he will leave the house with us. My husband, my daughter and myself are his only friends. In the beginning, I had to work3rd shift on my job because someone had to be home during the day with my son. I felt the same as you. He wouldn’t leave the house and it was driving me up the wall, but I keep praying asking God to give me strength. My husband and daughter would stay with him once they got off of work to give me a break. I would go to the hair and nail salon or just for a ride to clear my head. He get out the house more now. If we ask him do he want to go out to eat with us, he will go but on other days he doesn’t want to go anywhere. His treatment team said on the days that he don’t want to go anywhere don’t push him. I’m back on 1st shift on my job because he has been stable for about 8 months now and we are able to leave him at home while we work. My neighbors watch out for him and call us if he start to go to the left again, but he only go outside to smoke and then back in the house. You are not alone. We can relate to your story about your son. Things are ok for now, but I know this is a roller coaster ride with people who had this illness. ~Hugs to you~


#33

Sounds like you have come a long way myson, I am really happy that your son is stable and you are able to return to your normal work routine.

Thanks for the support too.


#34

Thank you. I’ll ask him and check out the Niacin book.


#35

My 19 year old is the same. He hasn’t left the house in months. I’m looking for suggestions to get him back into society. I’d love to find other young adults for him to socialize with. Any ideas? He was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia at 17, spent 8 months in a residential center. When he turned 18 they sent him home. What is the best to do, leave him alone or try to make him go out more? I’m not sure how much to push him because he gets mad and that kinda scares me.


#36

Ahh Cher is so hard to know what to do isnt it.
As a mum, I am always trying to encourage him, even some times I think right thats it Im not asking him again, but as a mother we keep trying , we don’t give up, its so difficult as its inbuilt in us.
I would cool off a bit as Its wearing on you . Maybe casually “suggest” it now and then.

I know though myself if I want to do something it comes from within, no amount of someone suggesting something to me will make me do it unless I want to.
Big hugs from the UK.


#37

Hello all,

I’ve just discovered this website - purely by accident - whilst googling ‘schizophrenia and fish oils’. I read through this thread and felt compelled to register and post a message. My wife has been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia for about 15 years now, she is currently taking clozapine, but she has absolutely no insight into her illness whatsoever.

Like the persons son in the original message, she does very little all day long: sleeping for 12-14 hours a day, the rest of the time either smoking, drinking cup after cup of tea/coffee throughout the day, or sitting on the loo talking to her ‘invisible friends’ as I call them!

As we run a business together (a b&b), I end up doing just about everything, as well as looking after our 13yr old son. All very, very frustrating.

I’m intrigued about this niacin - is it safe for anyone to take? I’ll order that book and see what it has to say. We live in Norfolk and to be perfectly honest, the MHT in this part of the world is absolutely rubbish - not entirely their fault, I know - funding cuts and all that.


#38

Welcome, Kevin99. I am glad you found this forum. I have found the posts and interaction to be a great resource, and it is filled with many very experienced individuals that provide primary support for their Sz loved ones. We are early in my 20yo son’s diagnosis. He also has no insight…and we are journeying the challenges of living very rural with no resources, support, or case management in trying to navigate his needs.

I do not have anything to offer (as we are still in that uphill place of non-compliance after being diagnosed) other than a welcome and to encourage you to come back as often as you need.

Wishing you and all others peace as you navigate whatever you may have on your plate with your loved ones.


#39

Thanks jmarie1067, I’m just glad I’ve found this place. I don’t want to hijack this thread so I might start a new one, but the issue of ‘no insight’ has always bugged me, I have never before come across a person who simply refuses to believe that they are unwell - despite all the evidence right in from of their face! That’s the illness, I guess!

I’ve just realised this is a global community - after reading a few posts it appeared to be a UK based one, so apologies for any ‘UK’ specific wording in my first post.


#40

Hi Kevin yes my son wasn’t even smoking or drinking – just watching TV or in his room doing… ? Pretty miserable life for them and when I said to the doctors when he was admitted after the latest suicide attempt they had to agree. And here’s the kicker clozapine is supposed to be top of the line!

Well you’d really like to hear about my experiences with niacin right? Ken is still on 400mg of clozapine and as he is released on a community care order he must continue with this for at least another 6 months.
However on 3gm ( 6x500mg) of niacin and 3gm Vit C ( 3X1000 units) I see continuous improvement. He is a lot more social, less anxious and has only had one episode of voices and low key at that. since he come home on 5 January. He was given a small dose of olanzapine to tide him over that he has continued to take in decreasing doses until today is the last day. If he is feeling at all anxious he asks me ‘is it time for my vitamins? I have no problem giving him extra if he thinks he needs it. Dr Hoffer in his book said none of his patients had toxified themselves by taking megadoses of these vitamins.

Our health system actually subsidises niacin but the doctor at the hospital was only willing to prescribe him 500mg per day- no problem I buy the rest for him. Originally I got him 500 gm no flush 50 tabs at $35 per bottle ! That was the only thing available here in New Zealand but then I went online and discovered that you can buy niacin and vitamin C much cheaper from the States. I got niacin 5x 100 tabs of 500gm plus Vit C 5x100 tab of 1000 units plus postage for around $70 New Zealand.
BTW I am not convinced that cuts in the health budget are a disadvantage in this case. As I said clozapine is top of the line, expensive but vitamins are super cheap. Big Pharma has a lot to answer for.
Be warned the doctors will look askance at you but what the hell eh! My son also is diagnosed with paranoid sz and doesn’t even know what are side effects from AP drugs and what is part of the disease. Now that’s no insight ! When you read the book you’ll understand why and why I think personally that talking therapies and trying to get the SZ to socialise without vitamin therapy a complete waste of time.
Best wishes
Liz