Family and Caregiver Schizophrenia Discussion Forum

Allsup disability application - How best to get SSI / SSDI


#1

Has anyone used Allsup to assist with SSI or SSDI?
I am trying to have 37 y.o. Son finish up his application.

It was recommended by a psychiatrist and wondered if anyone else was familiar with it?
Its hard to do this type of an application when one is not the actual applicant.

But it may come down to me completing it in order to get it done.

Sending my understanding and encouragement to all of us dealing with afflicted family member.

God bless.

TM


#2

it may be best to have a Social Security lawyer or Health Advocate helping you. they do not charge your upfront but takes like 25% from the first 6 months or less.

for my case, my Son was diagnosed in June 2015. They health Advocate lawyer started helping him in 2016 to get him all the back pay dues from Social security. My son just started receiving the SSI/SSD income in August 2017 and he received a percentage of all back pay since June 2015 and will eventually get remaining backpay amount due from SSD.
.
The main issue is to have your son available to sign the paper after your fill in the information for him, otherwise it will be difficult to do it all for him unless you have guardianship to represent it him.

if he is admitted to a hospital, the hospital social worker can help him with getting him connected to Health Advocates representative.

if your son has a case manager assigned to his case, the case Manager should also help.

Best of luck to you and your son


#3

My son completed the Allsup app and got turned down. It doesn’t give a reason.
Would you suggest trying to do the application to SSDI ourselves or look for an attorney who has this as their specialty ?

Much thanks,

Terry.


#4

Never heard of it. Here are some resources to help you get your loved on some disability payments:

Help with Social Security Insurance SSI
My son was granted SSI within 4 months of the initial application without the need for any appeals. Based on the experiences of others this is quite an accomplishment.
http://schizophrenia.com/family/ssi.htm

And:

Tips on Applying for Social Security Disability Benefits with Schizophrenia (click on link)

AND:

https://benbehindhisvoices.com/2013/08/schizophrenia-and-social-security-benefits/

and

https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/getting-disability-benefits-schizophrenia.html

related discussion on Diagnosed forum:

AND:

http://www.schizophrenia.com/insurance.html


#5

I filled out my son’s application - I wrote in the notes at the back that he was not capable of filling it out himself, which is very true.

I was very blunt & honest about what he can do & what he can’t with concrete examples.
Like, he can only rarely go in a store with me. When he does, he can’t go to the register and I have to purchase his items for him. If he can’t go into the store but waits in the car, he will have to lay down in the backseat sometimes so that people can’t see him. He thinks someone will harm him if they see him, and he has thought that he must leave with strangers before because if he doesn’t, something bad will happen. Once, he thought that a friend from school was going to get her legs chopped off because he didn’t go with someone he saw in a parking lot once.

I also used the words chronic, persistent and debilitating as often as I could.

He was approved in about 2 or 3 months with no outside help.

He had also been in the hospital 5 times in the previous 10 months until they found the right meds for him.
I stressed some of the ways he had put himself in physical harm as well like standing in the middle of traffic, trying to get out of a moving car, etc.

I put all of the ugly truth out there. I’m not sure if that’s what did it or not, but I didn’t sugar coat anything.


#6

I just wanted to bring this one up as it has a lot of good information about applying for ssi/ssdi


#7

Thanks for this info. We had help with my son’s application from a disability specialist at the mental health clinic here. Six months later and we got a decline letter yesterday. No reason given. Very frustrating as he wasn’t able to finish college and has never held a job for more than a few weeks. He’s 27 now. There are so many devastating facets to this illness.


#8

So very sorry you were denied, will you start the appeal process?


#9

OK, I think I am going to have to dive in and do this for my daughter. I keep saying I will, and then don’t do it… I sure wish she could do it with me, but she can’t.


#10

@hope Thank you. We have an appointment with the disability specialist next week. The SSA made at least three errors in their response letter, so I assume she will know how to handle it.


#11

I guess I am afraid to start this process because I assume it will result in disapproval just based on what I’ve heard at NAMI meetings (how difficult it is to get approved). It does dishearten me to hear of your recent disapproval @banana1 especially if you had a specialist help you. But, I guess not filing for almost a year since my daughter’s last hospitalization is going to spur me to at least get the first application in, since @hope mentioned that there might be a time limit before medical data expires. After 4 hospitalizations in 1.3 years and then none in the last 10 months time may be running out for me to get her filed with the past Dr. information and I doubt she will voluntarily change her mind to see a new Dr. It is so sad to see our children in this predicament.


#12

One of the things they stressed at our Family to Family classes in regard to filling out this application was what they believed was a typical error. They said it was a typical error was for the parents to write about what their adult child could do instead of focusing on what they couldn’t do. We were told to answer the questions based on their bad days, not their good days.

Parental habit makes us want to stress what they can do, we need to be realistic and paint the picture of their real day to day life, all the things they can’t do.


#13

Thanks for that tip! Yes, it makes sense to emphasize the real disabilities (and there are many).


#14

And you can see how we as parents would be all - “well on a good day he can make a sandwich” etc… Personally I think we do it because the list of what they can do gets pretty small.