Home, Diag Forum, About, Contact Us, FAQ

Violence Towards Family Caregivers by Their Relative with Schizophrenia


#1

This is a study out of Japan - but from what I’ve read, the issue is common everywhere. Family members suffer most from violence. Be aware and plan to help avoid bad outcomes. Also - to reduce risk of suicide, be sure to remove all guns, large knifes, ropes, etc. from the house.

There have been several violence-related deaths in Japan due to family violence by persons with severe mental illness against their caregivers. However, it is not often acknowledged that these violent acts are mainly directed at family members.

Of the 277 caregivers, 87.7% had experienced psychological violence and 75.8% had experienced physical violence perpetrated by their relative.

Full overview:


#2

This group did another study in 2016.

http://www.psy-journal.com/article/S0165-1781(15)30595-3/fulltext


#3

Dr Torrey wrote “The Insanity Offense” its a good read if you can handle the reality of the violence faced by some of the families. NAMI has been criticized by many for underplaying the risk factors to present a friendlier face on mental illness.


#4

I’m glad to see that a conversation has begun concerning the distortion of facts family members and the public are fed by nami and other sources.


#5

NAMI was at its best for me in the beginning, when I had absolutely no idea what schizophrenia even was. I was in NAMI meeting when I gained my insight and reality of what was happening sunk in. So, there is some attachment there for me. But while I believe in the mission of NAMI, I get a little tired of dancing around the tough topics. I think it perpetuates the stigma and keeps some needed information from folks who could really use it.

My two pennies.


#6

@pixelcat @Holly67

Dr Torrey has been one of NAMI’s more prominent critics. Like Holly67 points out, they are a good starting point for many families, but we have to open our eyes and educate ourselves.


#7

Amen. Unfortunately I was stuck in that initial phase expecting change that never happened for too long. It can and does happen but for many of us only when we realize it’s time to move forward.


#8

I never turn my back to them…


#9

My sz daughter has threatened me several times - once with a knife. I’ve always been able to manage her, but when I see a certain look come over her face, I’m frightened. Most of the time, she is loving and sweet. Although she is conscientious about medication and therapy, she still experiences intrusive thoughts of hurting others. It’s rare to hear this part of life as a caregiver discussed. It’s good to know I’m not alone.