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When someone with schizophrenia mentions killing?


#21

I think you should prevail upon your son not to say that. It’s unhealthy.


#22

I agree it’s unhealthy. The doctor says its fine. I wonder about the doctor. I want him in the hospital. Doctor not alarmed. He talks about God being crazy. He says God like him. He takes medication that don’t work. He needs a hospital for med change


#23

He does not remember anything he says.


#24

I never really had thoughts about killing people in particular but sometimes I had delusions to kill random people or to kill in general. I am an honest person and not a killer and I was always able to tell myself that and to tell my therapist and we worked it out. this past september though i Got strong delusiosn and AH to kill my mom. I could not be left alone with her. I had videos in my head of how I Would do it. I Can ovepower my mom. it was scary to me because I know she loves me. I ended up in the psych unit getting my meds increased. Even though I love my mom you never know when I would lose contorl to the voices.


#25

The best predictor of future violence is past violence.


#26

He hasn’t said it in about a week. I do know he plays a lot of video games with killing. He is 30 years old and how do you tell a 30 year old he can’t play a video game? That is one of the problems, These games would seem to me would get into someone’s head with this problem. Any opinions?


#27

This is a really bad thing. I would really try to stop supporting this (where does he get money to buy these games?

Here are three recent sources - this is well known in psychological and psychiatric research - only the issue gets clouded by lots of money flooding in (from video game companies) to try to make the issue seem controversial. Its not controversial in scientific communities.

Research has long shown a cause-effect relationship between television violence and aggression among children and youth who watch it. Many social scientists expect video games to have an even greater impact for the following four reasons:

Children are more likely to imitate the actions of a character with whom they identify. In violent video games, players participate as a character, and even choose which weapons they’ll use while fighting other characters.
Video games by their very nature require active participation rather than passive observation.
Repetition increases learning. Video games involve a great deal of repetition. If the games are violent, then the effect is a behavioral rehearsal for violent activity.
Rewards increase learning, and video games are based on a reward system.

http://www.pamf.org/parenting-teens/general/media-web/violentgames.html

**Myths and Facts
Myth 1. Violent video game research has yielded very mixed results.

Facts: Some studies have yielded nonsignificant video game effects, just as some smoking studies failed to find a significant link to lung cancer. But when one combines all relevant empirical studies using meta-analytic techniques, five separate effects emerge with considerable consistency. Violent video games are significantly associated with: increased aggressive behavior, thoughts, and affect; increased physiological arousal; and decreased prosocial (helping) behavior. Average effect sizes for experimental studies (which help establish causality) and correlational studies (which allow examination of serious violent behavior) appear comparable (Anderson & Bushman, 2001).

Myth 2. The studies that find significant effects are the weakest methodologically.
Facts: Methodologically stronger studies have yielded the largest effects (Anderson, in press). Thus, earlier effect size estimates -based on all video game studies- probably underestimate the actual effect sizes.**

New research suggests that hours of exposure to violent media like video games can make kids react in more hostile ways compared to ones who don’t spend lots of time controller-in-hand, reigniting the debate about children and gaming

Ever since Columbine, in which two students went on a deadly rampage at their high school, television, movies, and video games have been a popular target for senseless acts of violence.

“What this study does is show that it’s media violence exposure that is teaching children and adolescents to see the world in a more aggressive kind of way,” says Anderson. “It shows very strongly that repeated exposure to violent video games can increase aggression by increasing aggressive thinking.”

Brain imaging studies also hint that exposure to violent gaming may actually temporarily change the brain. In a 2011 study, for example, after a week of daily video gaming, brain scans of a small group of volunteers showed less activity in the regions connected to emotions, attention, and inhibition of impulses compared to participants who played non-violent video games. The effect appeared to be reversible, but the results suggested that extended periods of play could lead to more stable changes in the brain.


#28

That’s totally not cool to freak people out at all. I’m a vet and don’t agree with stuff like that. Hope he breaks the habit…or everyone can adjust and tell him a good dead baby joke?


#29

A video game won’t get him out of control is he really that ill? Violent games boost idiocy and motor reflexes for x box and ps4…I mean common…he’s not a navy seal with schizo…


#30

Firesign theatre once had a skit called (pass the lord and praise the ammunition…forward into the past)


#31

Easily - by saying if you want to live in our home you can’t play those video games. When you get a job and move out then fine - you can do it in your own home. These are called “limits” and since you control and pay for your home - you can set the rules.


#32

He is old…he should assess his priorities. Not his playstation.


#33

The problem is, I will try to sum it up. He also suffered a stroke right before he turned 20. I have lived with him for 3 years now. Not sure of the total reason he has never really tried to make his life better?He had his first break in Aug 2011. He can only live with us. I know he wants to live with his father but that environment would be horrible. My wife feels stuck, she doesn’t come out and say that. The one thing we do not allow is weed. That is all he would do if allowed. Every once in a while he will ask to get some beers which we know affects his moods also. My wife or stepson will not get any help other than meds (my wife suffers with chronic depression, I think because of his illness) I am in a bad situation that does not seem to be getting any better. Bottom line is he has no place else to go. I tell him every once in a while how good he has it because many people that suffer with his illness are homeless and have no one.


#34

Many of the people in our community who have schizophrenia do volunteer work which they find helpful and helps give their life meaning. Perhaps something to push for in your household?


#35

Thanks for the information on the video games. I have tried to get my wife to begin by going to NAMI meetings. She won’t go. Tried to get her to look into W.R.A.P. program, nothing.
http://www.mentalhealthrecovery.com/


#36

I would definitely remove violent things from his life…


#37

Thanks for your reply. I will do my best.


#38

No one should really joke about stuff like that, especially with so much of it still going on all over the world. Maybe you should mention that sense to him and he’ll stop with such threats.


#39

If he also seems to be losing touch with reality then I would have him seen by professionals. I’ve had voices command that I harm a particular individual, but, so long as I could retain insight with medications, I wouldn’t hurt a fly.


#40

I recommend him getting a personal therapist, so that he can work with someone to prevent prevailing confusion and identity issues later on. Even though that statement seems like something a lot of young boys say. I know tons of examples of kids who explore violence and what it means, or try to mimic other examples in the media. It would help that he can control it.