Family and Caregiver Schizophrenia Discussion Forum

Do any of you have a loved one who isolates/ or have you gotten them out of isolation?


#62

@lindag happy to hear of everyone with their loved ones getting better :heart_decoration: Q: does he express side effects of medicine such as some negative symptoms or a bit of depression of gaining bit of insight? My sister expressed that while she was on meds 3-4 years ago (not medicated anymore)…


#63

He does have excessive drooling at night and he did gain 100 pounds but has since taken 75 off. He has his life back and that’s wonderful


#64

Hi Lindag how much olanzapine is your son on ?


#65

I am so happy for you and your daughter I know what a great feeling this must be. All my prayers go out to you and your daughter.


#66

Thank you so much for your good wishes and prayers. Yes, this was the happiest 30 days in years. I do hope that she accepts her next shot. Her appointment is Jan 3rd.

Happy new year to you too, and I hope your son does better. It would be so nice for you both.


#67

Oldladyblue, I’m praying your daughter accepts her Jan. 3rd shot. If you don’t mind me suggesting, since this is still just the beginning and she is still lacking insight, I’d strongly suggest you promise something special to follow the event (the injection), like a special meal, or a special mother-daughter outing. Keep things as calm, loving, and non-confrontational as possible over these next 2 days.


#68

That is a great suggestion @Day-by-Day and I will try to figure something fun out for us to do.

I do so much appreciate the prayers and suggestions. It is a crucial time for her to keep on with her meds. I can see the psychosis beginning again, she is isolating more and talking to her voices again, although quietly and not all the time. I do so want for her to accept this shot. I’m almost afraid to talk to her about it at all. I don’t want to rock the boat. I did get her to confirm that her appt is Thursday and then I dropped the subject.


#69

I know how you feel. I remember things at the beginning were so unpredictable and so nerve-racking when injection time came. You just need to get her through one injection at a time. Think in the moment. Do whatever you have to do, even if it means bribery, but keep things calm. Have no additional expectations other than getting that thing injected into her arm. I know that sounds terrible, but this is what it takes.

With each month, it’ll get easier.

And if there’s a “next time”, make it happen at day 28, not day 30.


#70

Yes, it is definitely nerve-wracking. Thanks for the reminders to keep it calm. I must be single minded to help her get to that appt without an argument. Calmly. The key IS calmly, an argument will start resentment and that would be awful. Good tip on 28 days instead of 30 also, I will drop off a note to the clinic about scheduling for 28 days next month. Thank you.


#71

Well, my daughter went to the clinic for her appointment. I felt great on Thursday about that. She went on her own, and wouldn’t allow me to come.

However, today, I got a phone message from the clinic trying to reach her and asking her to return to the clinic. When I called to ask if she got her court ordered shot, I got the “She didn’t sign a release for you, so I can’t discuss this with you, but can you get her to come back here?” . I’m assuming she didn’t get the shot. I can pretty much tell as she is again talking to herself and developing antagonism towards my husband. Oh dear.


#72

Oh boy. I believe if it’s court ordered and she doesn’t go they will come and check on her. That’s what the doctor told my son. I believe they would take him to get it. Hang in there. At least you know she respnds well to medication. Darn it.


#73

Oh no. So sorry, oldladyblue. I wish I had said some more things to you earlier, to give you strategies and guidance. Maybe my ideas will help you in the future, or they’ll help someone else here on the forum.

I think at the beginning, a person with severe anasognosia cannot be trusted to go alone to an injection appointment. For the first few months, I insisted on driving and accompanying in the waiting area, saying “It’s not a choice. I’m coming.”

I waited until about month 6 before I allowed my son to go into the building by himself while I waited in the car. Even then, I would find some fake reason (ex. Need to use the bathroom, need to make an appointment for myself, etc) to go in to check on things (make sure he wasn’t faking it or hiding in the bathroom).

Now, even after about 15 months of injections, I wait in the car but I try my hardest to inconspicuously check to make sure there’s a bandage on his arm. I’ll say something like “What arm did you use today?”

A trick I used to get past the HIPPA nonsense and find out if the injection was definitely completed is to call the clinic and say “I need to set up an appointment for my son’s next injection. It needs to be 28 days after his last injection, but I can’t remember when that was. Can you please check what date that was?” This worked like a charm for me, but only because my son’s doctor office was allowing me to make the appointments. Not all do.

I really hope your daughter gets picked up and taken to the clinic. I’m praying for you all.

Edit: Although my son had court-ordered meds earlier in his illness, the community-based monthly injections were not court ordered. They were “ordered” by us, his parents, after one of his many hospitalizations, as a condition for living in our home. This is why I had to be the “heavy” in our situation. I hope you don’t have to be and the court order takes that burden off you.


#74

Don’t feel bad. I have a feeling they will come get her or maybe tell her that they will and it’s best if she goes back and you can take her on Monday. Sons doc said they usually give a day or two furlow before they’d come and get him. But we emphasized it’s so much better For a person to go on their own so they don’t have to force you. My son went on his own but I called for the first 4 months to make sure he got it. Now after seeing a few guys from jail that I stress could become his roommates he goes and gets them early. I have a feeling it will work out for you and your daughter. Stay strong if you can. Thinking about you.


#75

I appreciate your responses @DianeR and @Day-by-Day , I so much appreciate your input. After I read your answers, I actually had a great conversation with my daughter today about what happened at the clinic. I opened with “Someone at the clinic called me, thinking it was your number, and asked you to come back. Do you know why?”. She said someone told her to come back in 4-6 weeks, for her next shot, but didn’t realize she didn’t get the shot that was already due. She said it was a mix-up and will go back in on Monday.

I also got a call from the deputy sheriff with the supervised ROR program since she missed her Wednesday call-in, and he said the he would have his staff tell the judge if she doesn’t get her shot, and then she would be called in to talk to the judge to be reminded that she must stay medicated.

The system in place seems like it will work out. I am so hopeful.

She is even talking of looking for a job by the end of January.

It is still a miracle to me the complete change that has occurred since her Dec 2nd arrest and the following involuntary hospitalization.

I thank everyone on this forum again for their support, as the ongoing advice and comfort provided here it is what enabled me to take advantage of the arrest and speak to the judge and ask for medical help for her. It is a miracle that everyone helped me to receive.


#76

I am truly happy and grateful for the ones here with loved ones who are doing better…

I also feel that I keep repeating and writing the same things for over two months here I’m writing about my unmedicated isolating sister who’s refusing help, my heart aches, she’s 31, takes no further than few steps from her room to the living room to watch tv when no one is there and eats her food. Other than that, no response to my daily requests for her to leave the house with me for a walk or anywhere she wants or help me help her to try solutions, her hands and feet are swollen from lack of movement and God knows what other physical things her isolation causes…


#77

I so understand your mental anguish @Love_Hope over not being able to help your sister. We want the best for our loved ones and it is hard to watch then deny our help. Waiting until the right circumstances arise and then taking advantage of them is all we can do to help (when the time is correct). I hope you are being kind to yourself, as you did the best you could to help her, and no one could ask more than that.


#78

Love_Hope, my son could so easily be living the life your sister is. He has. It was awful to watch. I do realize how fortunate we are that circumstances and luck lead to our current situation, even if things are far from what they were “supposed” to be. I want this for you and your sister. Meds are the key. Sending prayers and hugs.


#79

I am happy to say that after ups and downs, my daughter got her 2nd Haldol 30 day shot. She walked out of the clinic without getting it Jan 3rd, I took her back to get it Jan 7th but she went into an anger fit in the reception area in front of about 25 people when we tried to get her to sign the HIPPA information release form, and then she stormed out of the clinic. I was stunned as it all happened in 60 seconds out of nowhere with her escalating into a loud public confrontation. A total stranger waiting in line asked me after my daughter left if she was on a Haldol shot, I said yes, she said “over 30 days now?”, I said yes, she said “paranoid schizophenia?” and I said yes, and she came over and gave me a hug and said she understood as she had a relative who experienced the same. She was so kind.

Later in the day, my daughter called me and asked me to take her back to the clinic. She wouldn’t let me go inside, I just dropped her off. But later, after she walked home, she said she got the shot, that she had to pay for it at her next shot appt which was Feb 8th. This evening, I can tell… she was out in the kitchen making food for herself, then asked me into her room to watch TV. This injection has me relieved and hopeful that the medicine will keep on helping her. She may not be part of the “real” world again yet, but she is a part of my household again now.


#80

I’m so happy for you. Enjoy this next month of less stress. It goes one month at a time. Sleep well.

I would really love a hug from a total stranger who understood what we go through.


#81

Oh yes @Day-by-Day , I probably will remember that hug for a long time. It was nice, calmed me down, and probably calmed down the whole room actually, as everyone was watching.

I guess that when my daughter returned the second time that day, the receptionist immediately contacted her medical assistant so my daughter could get her shot. The first time the answer was “Oh, you don’t have an appointment, and you need to sign this form.” Perhaps that set off the anger, I don’t know. But the second time (well third counting Thursday), she got seen by the medical team. I still have no right to talk to them (well, for them to respond to me) but the medical assistant will accept calls from me and take information now.

I now can guess why my daughter was arrested downtown last month: a scene such as went on in the waiting room was probably unfolding for some time in front of that business. I am thankful for the way everything unfolded up to and after her arrest, as without it, she wouldn’t be medicated and doing OK today.

But that hug in the waiting room still makes me smile.