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Does anyone ever


#1

Feel that they don’t know if their family member is (for want of a better word) faking it?
Now I know deep down he isn’t , but how can someone be ok, logical, sensible, accurate and then have bizarre beliefs and come out with bizarre statements that of course are untrue?


#2

Hi Jane57,
My first thought was my son was possibly faking this for attention or possibly getting medication like Prozac. Sometimes to this day, I am still fearful of this because he only says he sees or hears things, but he has never had a psychotic break or lost touch with reality. But he is young still, and maybe we caught it in time.

Jax


#3

What other symptoms does your son have jax ? How old is he?


#4

One of the clinical features of delusions is that they are irrational beliefs and that people can’t be reasoned with about them, so the delusions are usually not part of a seamless world view, but the person might even believe two or four or eight things that contradict each other.

These illnesses are called thought disorders because the type of thinking average people experience is not happening for people with sz. So, a person can be otherwise rational and have delusions at the same time.

Look for and relate to what one author calls “islands of sanity.” The ocean is the chaos of disordered thinking.


#5

Thank you, I just go through phases of uncertainty, he’s doing really well most of the time considering.


#6

We have a lot of care/support in the uk but we don’t have NAMI and it seems you guys get so much help, understanding and education from this organisation.


#7

Our daughter has a high IQ and even when paranoid and delusional could still fully function, drive, etc. You just have to remember that they/individuals are just that… individuals who are perceiving information inaccurately and then processing that information compromised. All are unique unto themselves so ability to function can be different for each person.