New diagnosis?


#1

Just needing a little advice or opinions…

I realize no one can diagnose, but now-after 20 years, my son may be getting a different diagnosis. The case manager at mental health court-along with her team are baffled by my son. He will not talk about his schizophrenia or let me say-he never admits to, or talks about any hallucinations

  • he is very secretive about his life. Very quick to anger, no patience, seems not to care about anyone else`s feelings or what is happening with them. extremely manipulating.

He has been off drugs for 2 years. doesn’t seem to appreciate the support he gets (have to say that its mainly just me and an aunt in california) Doesnt want to get some tests done for his seizures. Mentioned this site to him and he tells me that he`s heard enough about his disease to last a lifetime.

Afew weeks ago, he called me to say he was having hallucinations. That was a first. He is 37 years old.
His case manager is suggesting that maybe he has a personality disorder.
Schizo something personality disorder???
I have a sister with bipolar, a father that was diagnosed with borderline schizophrenia-----this was a LONG time ago.
They are trying to push him to get these tests so they can see if anything organic is going on…from the accident he had at 19, or from the drugs he used. My son is stubborn as a rock. Can`t talk him into anything.
What do you think of this?**


#2

I found the Dual Diagnosis program at psych hospital is good. Dual Diagnosis is when you have both schizophrenia and a drug/alcohol problem. The program is effective. Enquire at the local psych hospital.


#3

could be schizotypal personality disorder. His whole not speaking much thing sounds spot on like it. Go look it up on google, its basically a milder form of schizophrenia. Low doses of antipsychotics are used to treat it.


#4

http://schizotypaldisorder.webs.com/


#5

My diagnosis have changed as I’ve gotten worse or better. I was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder before my Undifferentiated Sz diagnosis.

He finally admitted to hallucinations… that is a huge break through. I can understand him not wanting to keep talking about it. There was a time where if one more person… just one more… even mentioned Sz; I was going to have a Scarlet O’Hara hissy fit. (yes I am a man)

My anger and lack of empathy didn’t give up until I was put in CBT and anger management to relearn this and get shown what I was doing and how it was affecting people around me and how it was blocking my healing process.

I’m glad an outside force is talking to your son. A case manager is trained, family is just sort of expected to know it seems. It always get me that training is never offered to family members unless they fight for it. NAMI has been a very good thing for this family. But it was a lot of trial and error.

Congratulations on this small yet big step. It only takes a small rock to start an avalanche. Small things create big change later on. Good luck.


#6

I wouldn’t worry to much about the diagnosis as long as he is getting treatment for whatever symptoms he is currently experiencing. My son is diagnosed with paranoid sz and has a lot of symptoms of ADHD. He doesn’t agree with having it but that doesn’t change the symptoms. To a certain degree he accepts that we tell him that he has sz but he doesn’t feel it’s something that needs to be fixed. I question the sz diagnose. Personally I think he has drug induced psychosis but only time will tell. Whatever the diagnosis he is currently on a good med regimen and is stable.

On a side note. Yesterday my son said he may want to try ADHD medication. For about a month or more we have tried to talk to him about it but he insisted no. So I dropped it. I think sometimes the less I push something and let him think it through on his own then he gives in easier. I call this his ODD (oppositional defiant disorder), another unconfirmed diagnosis that his main worker has also acknowledged him having symptoms of.


#7

I think you are right. He has been diagnosed ar paranoid-dual-now this! The only thing I know is that once he stopped using drugs, he started getting more agitated and hostile–and for maybe the first time-experiencing his symptoms full on. Is there ever a "right diagnosis?


#8

**Yes-he will listen to almost anyone but his mom, or any close family member! Thank you-and I do feel that he has turned some corners in the last 2 years. **


#9

You are SO right! The more I step back, the better things seem to go. I used to joke that if I wanted my son to try anything,tell him the opposite of what you want him to do! lol! I think deep down, he has always tried to be independent. It`s taken him a long time to get this far, and a lot of hard knocks~~~


#10

My son and I went through a hard period getting him off his daily habit of marijuana. He was dual. Psychosis and addiction. Hopefully we will not have to visit that again at least not to that degree. I can say he was almost literally climbing the walls with withdrawal that he calls anxiety :smile: He still uses sometimes but his last break I think made an impression.

I looked into how to discipline ADHD and ODD. Some of those guidelines helped me a lot to cope and adjust my own actions. One of the bigger things is asking instead of demanding. If I can ask him to do something instead of telling him to do it… big difference in reaction. Still takes patience and asking in a monotone or nice tone several times but I don’t get the negative reactions the same. I have even joked with my son that his ODD his acting up and sometimes he will smile and agree. Helps to lighten the mood. He hated me watching him take his meds. I stopped watching, directly anyways lol I still keep an eye out but I don’t hover.


#11

It sounds like you and your son are healing together. This is very good news. The fact that there is a little humor hovering around the edges I feel is a very big sign. I really am starting to see genuine humor as an indicator of healing. When one is really feeling rotten, nothing is funny. But as one comes out of it… things are funny again.

That is the worst. Having someone stand there and watch. It makes me feel like I’m 5 years old again and not to be trusted to even swallow. It really does feel weird having someone standing there watching intently as I do something like swallow a pill and some water. I used to tell my parents… “I’m going to pee next if you want to watch something really exciting, stick around for the big finish as I tie my shoe.” :stuck_out_tongue:


#12

I really appreciate the fact that my son and I can make light of some of this and that he can see the humor in my little jokes. I sometimes worry that he may take it wrong but so far that hasn’t happened.

A couple of little jests we have shared (no offence intended) :

He said “I’m beginning to see why people would think that all this power might cause insanity.” I replied “How about I switch that around and say that only insane people would want all that power.” He laughed and said “Good point.”

Yesterday he showed me where he burned a hole in his finger and I said: see you really are a danger to yourself. He kind of looked at me with a smile and rolled eyed look that said stupid mom but in a good way.

I think my son has made comments like this too. :wink:


#13

My daughter has been diagnosed with just about everything under the sun. I no longer waste my time worrying about a diagnosis. Your son is now 37 years old and finally admitted he is hallucinating. Maybe he’s finally breaking through his denial.

In a previous post I mentioned my friend Bob and how he lived on the streets for many years until he reached the age of 40. He cleaned up his act, started receiving mental health care and lives a very stable life today. He owns a house with a girlfriend he met after the age of 40 who in her previous life was an RN but because of her mental illness can no longer work.

I also strongly believe that most human beings want to survive and will do anything to survive. Your son’s survival instincts appear to be in high gear. Hang in there – you just never know what is around the corner. It sounds like he is almost ready to get help.


#14

Sorry I meant to write son and not daughter. I was thinking of my daughter when I was writing my previous post.


#15

This has to be true…It is truly a miracle he is alive. I really believe that the drugs he was abusing made everything worse. Being clean for 2 years has made a huge impact. I think [ HOPE! ] that maturity has a lot to do with it–which all of us have to go through sooner or later…