Family and Caregiver Schizophrenia Discussion Forum

Extended inpatient care


#1

My son was diagnosed with sz 4 years ago. He just got out of the hospital again. They switched his meds but only kept him there for 7 days. Exactly, what I knew would happen is happening. The new dosage is very low and his delusions are worse than when he went in.

What has been others experience in finding extended impatient care? They really need to be in-house to get them more stable. The only thing the social worker wants to know is where is he going when they are ready to discharge him. Seven days isn’t enough time to take him off a high dosage of zypreza and start him out with a low dose of abilify. The hospital said they are for acute care only.

Has anybody had any luck getting extended residential care? Something for like a couple months until their meds are more stable?

Any advice would be great


#2

What age is he ?
Does he ever communicate normally with you?
Where do you live ?


#3

Be prepared to have gobs and gobs of money at standby, if you’re lucky enough to get a bed, that is. It’s VERY hard these days to land long-term residential treatment. Not trying to be Debbie Downer, but that’s today’s reality. MAYBE if you have tip-top-tier insurance you could land a bed, but I wouldn’t count on it. Best way to find out is to do a Google search and make some phone calls tomorrow.


#4

Where we live in the US, it is not possible to get extended care to the point of stability in an acute care inpatient setting, but may be available in a state hospital.

What people do where we live is make it a longterm project:
-keep excellent records of all treatment and appointments for MI
-wait until someone is really ill to attempt hospitalization in acute care facility (if needed for safety)
-Once there, request commitment and treatment in the state hospital based on the fact that they are “treatment resistant” and they keep having well-documented relapses that lead them to acute inpatient facilities or jail
OR
-ask for the Assertive Community Treatment team that monitors people in outpatient commitment of one year overseen by the state government

There are also a bunch of longterm, voluntary care places where people stay for months if there is enough money to do so. There are none in the state where we live. These places are expensive: http://www.artausa.org/#directory That list is just for one set of places; there are more like that.

I think contacting your insurance company to see whether there are any facilities in your network would be another place to check, along with all of alien99’s suggestions.

I hope your son feels better soon.


#5

He is 25 and we live in ohio. Not sure what you mean when you ask if he communicates normally with me? It is hard to have a conversation with him. His focus is very minimum. I have to call his name several times to ask him a simple question. When he wants to talk to me is to try to get me to validate his delusions. I don’t go there anymore since I know these things are very real to him. I


#6

Hospitalization is really only for crisis care. Extended stays in a state hospital, for example, are only for people who do not respond to treatment and are a threat to themselves or others. I know you won’t like the sound of this, but if your son doesn’t fit in that category then a hospital stay isn’t right for him. Try to connect him with community resources, drop-in centers, BCMs, peer specialists, doctors, group therapy etc.


#7

Poor guy so young really sad :frowning: I feel for you, I live in the UK and had a hard time understanding why it was only a week because I was in for a month and a half, sorry it was bad wording of the question. I’m sorry I can’t help you


#8

My older sister has been living at a nursing home/convalescent hospital for the last 8 years after an overdoes. Four months ago, her psychiatrist lowered her medication and my sister has been to four emergency rooms and lock downs. She was discharged way too soon as well. Each time, I told them, she is not ready to leave and she stayed up to 14 days at times. There were several patients there with same problem. Is your son manageable? I am asking because nursing homes do not want patients with mental illness. Simply because there is no money in it for them. They make money with patients who aren’t mobile. My sister has been asked to leave on numerous occasions over the years. Each time, I said no and asked if they would take the responsibility for her downturn. Nursing home is a depressing and lonesome place but, patients with this type of illness do better in an environment such as this. I visit my sister frequently to make sure everything is under control. Is your son able to manage his medication? He might be too young for a nursing home. My mother took care of my sister for 30 years and now it’s my turn.


#9

My experience here in Canada is that hospitals only keep for crisis. Once the crisis is over they want to release.


#10

Best long term care here is with the state hospital and he’s been to all of the hospitals. After 7-10 days they have to go before the judge to keep them. Many times they want to get out immediately. My son is on Medicaid.


#11

The doctor has to fight for a longer stay. And the staff has to be sure to chart in a way to indicate the patient still meets inpatient criteria.

Is your son on private insurance or Medicaid? It is sad but true, people who are not indigent and/or in legal trouble can rarely get placed is a state hospital these days, at least in my area.


#12

We’re in CA. Had same story like you and struggles. With last hospitalization I refused to take hi home because his siblings doesn’t feel safe. It made Social worker worked hard!! Because we have private insurance he is now placed @ Sovereign health in San Clemente. Not the best place in my experience but at least for stability and therapy and meds mgt its working plus he’s not wandering in the streets.