Family and Caregiver Schizophrenia Discussion Forum

On her own


#1

My daughter moved out recently. When she was living with me I could hardly get her to talk to me. She stayed in her too most of the time and didn’t converse much at all. Since she moved out day before yesterday, she has called me every day just to say hi and has lots to tell me. She even called me to ask when her next doctor appointment was. Still a long way to go but I am glad she is communicating. I feel like I have to keep the line of communication open, even if i don’t agree with her choices. I always get the “just let her go” from friends and family but I can’t do that. She has lost all her friends and I’m sure the rejection, though warranted, is still painful. I have to hear that I am enabling her by helping her out, etc. I’m just glad she has talking. :blush: I have to keep trying to get her back.


#2

My son doesn’t talk much either and stays in his room a lot. It gets very lonely for me sometimes, especially since his Dad left me last August. I wonder if he doesn’t talk much because too much meds or it’s a negative symptom. Or maybe he just doesn’t have much to say since he stays home most of the time and when he does go out it is with me. I disagree that the rejection from her friends is warranted. Other illnesses cause a lot of unpleasantness too, but people with mental illness are the only ones blamed for the mess their symptoms can cause. I am praying for God to give you wisdom.


#3

I am recently separated also, since January 2014. I know what you mean by “it gets lonely” it is sometimes worse to have someone in the house who doesn’t communicate than to be alone. I think in my daughter’s case anyway, she is so deep in her own thoughts that she doesn’t know how to have regular every day conversation. I noticed this symptom when the first onset of mental illness came. I try to engage her in conversation. Sometimes it even takes awhile for her to answer a yes or no question. It’s like she didn’t he’s me but I know she did. I wonder if that is a typical symptom?


#4

you love your daughter…
and your daughter knows that she has a soft/safe place to fall if she needs it.
good on you :heart:
take care :alien:


#5

Sometimes when my son takes a long time to answer, he is listening to voices. None of the antipsychotics he tried really helped the voices much. Lithium seems to have had a very positive effect on those though. And not talking much is considered a negative symptom. The medical jargon for it is poverty of speech.


#6

**Your daughter moving out on her own is a positive step to live her own life. She will always need you to help, but let her take this step, and keep the safety net up.
My son is not on medication, but he is really trying to to take charge of his life himself. He gets angry if anyone offers advice when not asked for.
If your daughter takes awhile to answer back-she is probably dealing with a lot of “noise”. Be patient. She has to learn on her own-everyone does–and everyone needs help at times. That is why you are there. :hatching_chick: **