Family and Caregiver Schizophrenia Discussion Forum

Anti depressants


#1

Hi I’m just wondering how many carers have needed them at some point and if they help with the emotional roller coaster ? I have a diagnosed partner and we have had a lot of ups and downs over the years but this year in particular has been a rough one. We have spent a lot of time apart physically but maintained contact most of the time through phone txt and the occasional FaceTime call.
It seems as though things start to get better and I can almost grab hold of a ‘normal’ family life then something comes up and its way off in the distance again. Ive been on an emotional low for so long I can’t remember the last time I was actually happy at a time I should be rather then just feeling relieved there’s some calm before the storm starts again or the last time I actually laughed so Im hoping they could be of some help but I have worries they might do more harm then good or that I’m just complaining about nothing and don’t really need them at all so thought I’d ask about others experiences with them to help me decide wether it’s something worth trying
Thanks everyone :blush:


#2

Hello, Along with being a family member, I have my own set of MI diagnoses. After years and years, my symptoms have gotten much worse. The stress of seeing my family member suffer so much and being able to help in only the most limited and basic ways has been almost too much. I became physically ill along with my MI symptoms massively increasing.

I think it’s good to try anything that might improve quality of life. I did try anti-depressants. Zoloft worked pretty well (until experiencing a rare “syndrome”). I had energy and could focus more readily. I felt great on Wellbutrin until I developed very strong delusions that are maybe there all the time for me, but took over until the medication was out of my system. When I was young and “drug naive” in every way, I tried a tricyclic and started hallucinating almost non-stop.

I take GABA, theanine, melantonin each night to help sleep. Every once in a while (once or twice a month), I take xanax to sleep. Also, vitamins, esp vitamin D and magnesium seem helpful.

Some people I know have had good, long-term results with anti-depressants; whatever helps seems like a good idea. That’s why I keep trying…what if it works? What if my day to day life becomes more manageable?

The majority of family members I know are either in counseling, on medication, or both.

If anti-depressants help you, take them! If they harm you, don’t. Everyone is different.

You’re not “complaining about nothing.” The rough years start to add up. Do everything you can to take care of yourself. The better shape you are in, the more you can be there to support the person you love. (I desperately need to take my own advice.)

I think it’s okay to let the ideas/expectations of a “‘normal’ family life” go, but please don’t give up on the dream of smiling and laughing again. Try anything, even looking up jokes online.


#3

Thank you for sharing your experience it’s much appreciated
i feel a little defeated admitting I may need them to be honest but I guess if I look at it in the way of improving my quality of life like you said it doesn’t seem as bad
Your right about looking after myself to be able to support my partner better I think because I’m feeling low all the time it’s hard to be understanding of things he says and does and seperate what he can’t help and when his just being a jerk which causes conflict at times
On more thing isn’t it funny how it’s always hard to take your own advice especially when it’s good honest advice


#4

I would definitly say see a doctor. I completely agree with everything @Hereandhere said. I’m diagnosed and what’s happening to you right now is what I’m afraid will happen to my boyfriend any day now.


#5

I don’t think you need to worry too much I’m sure that your partner knows and understands what struggles and worries you have some of which aren’t too different from people that don’t have a MI
From my perspective I’ve read and fully understand what I chose to take on and although it’s hard sometimes and challenging I wouldn’t change my decision because the good times are worth all the bad times and I’d have to say your partner would be on the same boat or they wouldn’t be there :blush:


#6

Im on Zoloft, and have been on it for years. It has really helped me. Sometimes, I will up the dose a little if It seems like Im down more than usual.
This started when my son was diagnosed, but I think I carry my mother`s genes in being chronically depressed.
Sometimes you need a little help OO


#7

I take Ixel, kind of like effexor. I took antidepressants before my husband and I married. I’d had problems with depression off and on for a long time. I resisted taking them at first because I was afraid that I would need them for life. That was the worst case scenario for me, in my mind. What convinced me was realizing that even in my worst case scenario, there was no reason that I should continue to suffer, when medication could help me. I started out with ssri, celexa. I took that for years. I switched to an SNRI, after going through a lot of difficult situations. (and for onceapoet, no not all of it was because of my husband) SSRI’s work on the serotonin receptors, and SNRI’s work on serotonin, and norepinephrine. Start with an ssri, because snri’s can be too much for some people to start out with. Don’t hesitate to take them. It will definitely help you deal. If I didn’t have them, I wouldn’t be able to get out of bed all day.


#8

Thanks heaps for taking the time to share advice and experiences I started on Zoloft today so guess now it’s just waiting to see if it helps any thanks again everyone


#9

It takes about a month before you’ll feel much of a difference. But once you do, it’ll be like a load was lifted off your shoulders. You’ll probably have side effects the first week or two, but those will go away once you’re use to the med. So stick with it, and don’t give up :smile:


#10

I had the first one today with out any side effect what so ever so hoping I’m one of the lucky ones that doesnt get them
Thanks for the encouragement I haven’t told friends or family I’ve started taking them as yet so it’s nice to have some support


#11

I hope you feel better:)


#12
  1. I would be VERY cautious about resorting to a chemical solution for what is not (at it’s core) a chemical problem. Stress becomes chemical after a while, but can be better dealt with non-chemically. See the thread at http://forum.schizophrenia.com/t/on-stress-and-stress-management/35977

And please understand that the social norm among sz patients is that pills are the answer.

  1. Get a copy of this book and read it. Have your family read it, too.
    http://www.amazon.com/Surviving-Schizophrenia-6th-Edition-Family/dp/0062268856