Daughter arrested tonight


#1
  1. LARC-PETIT FIRST Offense
  2. POSSESS CNTRL SUBS WO PRESCIPT
  3. DRUG EQUIP POSSESS AND OR USE
    Bond is $2750 but I am not helping. Even if I wanted to I can’t.

The jail said I can bring her Seroquel tomorrow and she will see the Pdoc Tuesday. What a shame this happened.

Yes, her fault that she made bad choices. I don’t understand why she has this much difficulty,


#2

Dear Lil,

   I'm a schizophrenic with lots of drug addiction, but I'm also 64 years old and doing very well.  I share your frustration with loved ones making their own situations worse by their own behaviors.  

Jayster


#3

Thank you Jayster. I hope she does as well as you! What’s it going to take her to realize consequences I wonder.


#4

I’m so sorry for your situation. She will get help, just show her u want better of her. Show her the person she can aspire to be. Drugs are disgusting and I’ve lost friends to it so I understand. There is no such thing as a lost cause and some users think they are ruined but they can quit I helped a friend quit.


#5

I don’t know your daughter, of course. My experience, however, suggests that a 25 year old schizophrenic with a history of drug use often has the emotional maturity of a 14 year old. I think such was the case with me.

Schizophrenics may mature slowly, but they often do mature. An important consideration is to try to keep them alive while they are acting like teenagers who have been prematurely given the responsibilities and privileges of adults.

J.


#6

I’m an addict. I smoked crack and did other drugs between the ages of 25 and 29. I did A LOT of stupid things in my addiction. I always felt like I was in control but ultimately, in reality, the drug controlled me. I just barely avoided getting arrested a couple of times. I mean once I was in the back seat of the police car with handcuffs on when the cop searched my car and found crack (a felony) AND a used hypodermic. But by a miracle he let me go. But today I have 24 years clean thanks to AA, CA, and NA. With addiction, or even before addiction takes over, it is par for the course to do things you would never do if you weren’t using drugs.
I also am doing alright, right now, all things considered.


#7

Hopefully this can be a bit of a wake up call for your daughter.

Thursday I took my son to a shelter. Part of me is done being responsible for his choices.


#8

Thank you for that advice. I will try to help her know to not give up that she can still do great things.


#9

That is exactly it Jayster. She is about 14 ish mentally. Law enforcement even told me once they think she is between ages 13-15! As a parent it has been one of the most difficult parts of this illness.


#10

Thanks for all your responses! Very helpful to know someone else has been down this road too.


#11

hello, I’m sorry your family has to go through this. I’m sorry your daughter landed in jail.

It took me a very long time to pull myself together. I also had an addiction problem and eventually my parents couldn’t help… but as you know, there is only so much time, money, energy anyone has.

I have NO idea how I didn’t end up in jail, but here I am… almost 30 and I’m just now sort of seeing that actions have consequences.

I’m afraid that for a while you might feel like your on a spin cycle. My parents were so confused/ frustrated when I would make the same mistake over and over.

I hope things get better for you and her.


#12

I feel very bad for you and your daughter. I hope she gets help.


#13

I only hope this can be a lesson learned for your daughter and a reason to move on and make some changes in lifestyle.

I was very lucky to have never been arrested for drugs. I could have been very easily, I was very lucky. The only time I was caught it was with only one joint in my cigarette pack and the officer suggested I grind it under the heal of my shoe and we could call it a night.

I know however how fast drugs can take you down, especially those considered the harder substances…not something to mess with those. However I know plenty of people who’ve been to jail for drugs and have since turned their lives around, they don’t seem to be the majority but there are enough of them that I tend to think there is hope for those in these circumstances.


#14

I am so sorry that you have to go through this. Hope she realizes with this arrest. I know sometimes it is a wake up call. Hope this is her last one. Good luck.


#15

You are probably doing the right thing. I wish I would have been able to do the same with my son a long time ago. At least she is still going to be able to see her doctor and get her meds. My son also did drugs, after years of going on this merry-go-round, Mental Health court was born. For people with MI that have jailtime. They have been a major factor in getting my son stable, med-compliant-which in turn has given insight. I hope your daughter can go through this type of program.


#16

im sorry you have to get through this, mental illness is real illness but so is drug addiction. focus on the silver lining if you can, she isnt in jail for murder so thats something “you still have” its so hard to be optimistic especially with tough situations and this illness but as humans to avoid suffering we have to invent value in whats left over after something is taken away, like her freedom for instance. even terminal illness patients try and do this to preserve a good enough mood.

give her books that focus on people who have to live in jail forever, or even worse get the executioners chair. i hate the phrase “think positive” because no one is positive all the time. what people should really say is something like “distract yourself with negative that could have happened” this stuff at least for me makes really hard times bareable. just the really difficult times.

distract yourself from the bad feelings into a mood of appreciation. if someone substantial is taken away from you, all we can do is count over and over again what we have left. easier said than done, but i hope this helps. she might not have freedom but at least now its a stable place to stay. easier said than done, but its what ae have to do in order to fight depression.