Feeling overwhelmed and depressed


#1

Hey guys, some of you may know about my mom and her journey but she is schizophrenic and has now been taken off the meds by her doctor. so now weve been carefully waiting to see if symptoms reappear. Ive been feeling really lonely and overwhelmed with life, im a senior in highschool and i work 25 hours a week and i have all this stuff and home and i feel like i dont want to do anything anymore. i have no motivation, i could stay in bed all day if i could. Im struggling and i dont feel like i can go to anyone because i dont want people to stress over me and people expect me to just be okay. anyone have any advice or encouragement? also how are you all feeling today?


#2

Hey, it’s really hard living with someone not knowing when paranoia and delusions will reappear. This place is a good start to find support. I’d also recommend seeing a counseler. Find your local Carers group they sometimes provide free counseling and look for support groups for carers of people with mental illness.

It’s ok to feel depressed. I’m sure many of the members here can relate. Our lives are different to others. We have worries and responsibilities that others may never understand but stay strong. Remember to make time for yourself along this journey and be kind to yourself as well.


#3

No motivation, not wanting to do anything but stay in bed . . . that sure does sound like depression. Not surprising with all that you’ve been dealing with. The uncertainty of your mother’s situation can’t be helping any.

Why don’t you call a doctor and make an appointment for yourself? A medical professional would treat your situation in a matter of fact way, without stressing over you or expecting you to simply continuing coping.

In the meantime, try to spend some time outside every day, in the sun if possible. Exercise is supposed to help, too, although I know it’s really hard to do if you’re depressed. Maybe just take a walk every day. Do you know anyone with a dog that you could walk?

I hope you feel better soon.


#4

@rspan
I feel for you.
I know what it’s like to go to school, work, and come home to more chaos.
It’s not the only reason, but it was a big motivating factor in my decision to enlist in the military. There were a lot of days as I was waiting for my bootcamp ship out date where I thought to myself, “Just a little longer and everything will change.”

I’m not saying it’s the only (or even best) choice for you.
But you’re a young adult or close to it. You can start building your own, independent life very soon.

Going off to far away places, meeting strange people, and learning what I was made of… Away from my family… Was a big part of becoming who I am.
Sure I visited when I could. About once a year during the holidays. But being on my own was a really great start for me, hard work, and challenges included.

I feel like I didn’t tie this in very well…
What I mean to say is:
You can take a look at what opportunities are out there for you. College scholarships (if you earned them), work (if you’re lucky enough to be in a good career field already), and if nothing else seems enticing; military.
Base these decisions on what you want and how you feel you want your life to start heading toward.
Don’t base it on what other people want from you.
Don’t shy away from a challenge. You’re already working hard, it doesn’t get much harder than what you’ve already got going on (even in the military). The struggle just changes, where some things are easier and others are harder. But the kind of person you will be is dictated by the environment you place yourself in and which priorities you choose to engage first.

So, things are tough now. I have had a taste of what it’s like. But it doesn’t preclude you from building your own life.
And doing that isn’t selfish.
It is selfless.
Your family probably needs you to be successful and fulfilled so that you can help them when they are in need. Often for a young adult, that means changing your focus away from family for a few years.

Not cutting ties… Just going on your own to find your success so that you can all benefit together eventually.


#5

Hi, I feel for you. You are not alone. I agree with those that say you should see a doctor for possible depression for yourself. Walking outside and exercise are also good things. Getting non with your own life is also a good thing. But I do caution you to not try the military until you have been cleared for depression. My son started in the military and was discharged for depression and that was the beginning of his other mental health issues as it was untreated.

Also consider looking up some crisis hotline numbers so that you can get support 24x7 as you need it. You have a lot on your plate as a young adult. Don’t do it alone… Reach out to others like you have done here.

You can’t change or control anything with your mom, just yourself! You need to take care of you!

You are smart to ask for help. I hope you get some help soon.
Hugs to you!


#6

I’m so sorry your going through this. I truly believe having someone to talk to is very beneficial. We all need to vent. But before you jump onto meds have you looked into lithium orotate for yourself along with a good plant based omega 3.
YouTube John Gray on Lithium Orotate.
There are also many other videos to watch. I have recommended this to several people and all have had a good outcome including my husband who suffers with extreme anxiety and depression. It’s not a medication it’s a natural mineral. Just YouTube it like I suggested and see for yourself. Also, if you look at the reviews on Amazon under Lithium Orotate Adavanced Reasearch you will be impressed.
I hate to see anyone go down the path of medication if there is something more natural and noninvasive that can help you through this difficult time.
Good luck I wish you well and peace.


#7

After years of struggles, including events like my son’s diagnosis and my mother’s death, I finally told my doctor that I was depressed and she prescribed antidepressants for me. I now feel normal for the first time in years. My coping skills have soared. I was always ‘glass-half-full’ and resisting negative self-talk but I still eventually got beaten down. I wish I’d done it earlier. I’m not planning to come off them any time soon!


#8

Sigh, I wish I could give you a hug. I understand your feelings. My sons both moved out of the house as soon as they could afford it because living with their sz sister was upsetting to them. It is true that most people who don’t have a severely ill relative don’t understand the problems of living with and caring for someone who is sz.

When I feel too depressed, I sit in my car and cry, as I can’t afford anyone to see me that way, I’m too busy.


#9

Hatty, May I ask what is working for you? I’m seriously considering going for help, I feel I do need to be something. I thought I could do it without meds, but the daily, sometimes hourly struggles with my son are just too overwhelming and it’s literally draining any little life I have left out of me
Thank you in advance


#10

Your doctor would decide what to prescribe (at least here in the UK) but mine gave me a low dose (50mg) of sertraline. That was enough to get me exercising too so I have really started to function better.