Family and Caregiver Schizophrenia Discussion Forum

Police Awareness?


#1

My son is currently being detained in a detention center in Chesterfield, South Carolina. He had been receiving increasing increments of Invega Sustenna.His last injection was 234 ml. His Dr. changed his medicine to Haldol and started him on 125 ml injections every 4 weeks. I noticed a decline in his behavior, ie. an increase in his positive affects, voices, hallucinations etc.I contacted his mental health providers and reported my concerns. They increased his frequency and dosage but it was too late. He had an acute episode two days before and one day after his increased dosage. He is now stabilized and is not a threat to himself or society, but because we do not have a mental court in our state, I am unable to get him out of jail and am really struggling as to why? He didn’t have any malice in mind and just wanted to come home. His charge is theft of an automobile. That being said, I had just arrived home from work when the police pulled into my yard. I didn’t know what was going on. I asked the officer. He replied, " Chad is what…" He motioned to his vehicle were I saw my son screaming and crying asking me why is this happening to him? And saying the cuffs hurt and were too tight. The officer just laughed.


#2

Man that’s seriously messed up. Unfair treatment of the mentally ill is a real problem. Especially from police, they aren’t trained to handle mentally ill people. I think they should learn to be aware and how much and what meds to give someone.

Do you think he was actually trying to steal from a car?


#3

I am sorry this is happening to your son and you too as a mother. Must be hard. I had run ins with officers when I was ill but I luckily didn’t break any laws. I think the cops always put the cuffs on too tight. I remember that but endured it when it happened to me when they transported me to mental hospitals. I don’t know the circumstances your son did to get arrested about stealing a car. I guess he would have to face criminal charges for that. Perhaps get a psychiatrist to help your son get a mentally ill verdict? I don’t really know.


#4

Yeah, I called the police once to transport me to the psyche ward. Two patrol cars pulled up. While one cop was putting me in the backseat of his car I heard the other cop ask him what was going on.The first one replied to him, “Just another schizo”. A little offensive.


#5

My heart goes out to you.


#6

Thank you for your input. I teach 5th graders at Pageland Elementary and am often dishearten by what I hear. People are afraid of what they don’t understand.


#7

So your son’s schizophrenia caused him to steal a car?


#8

No. The change in his medicine I would imagine did. I don’t pretend to know what’s going on in his head, or heaven forbid be in his head. I’m just trying to understand and have been for awhile now/


#9

No, not steal from a car. He saw a car at a car lot and asked to test drive. Saw the keys in it and drove home.


#10

That is very insulting and offensive, and for many cops, this is typical behavior towards the severely mentally ill.
Before I was escorted to the psych ward by the cops- years ago, a couple of them said that they wanted to “work me over” outside.
Too many cops are not trained to deal with the mentally ill.
In my opinion, if you have a mental illness and did something criminal and you were psychotic at the time, you belong in a Hospital, not prison.
In jail, you will not get proper treatment - this is really ridiculous


#11

GET A LAWYER… if infact he was driving a stolen car you need a lawyer


#12

Not to stereotype police officers, but yes, this unfortunately is typical behavior. That is why I want to bring public awareness to this injustice. My son was also picked up by an ambulance about a year ago in Monroe, NC. He was picked up because he said he was going to commit suicide. While in the ER the nurses had trouble drawing blood, he has rolling veins. The police were called and they beat him up and tasered him in a 10X12 ER room.


#13

Yes, I have contacted our State Representative Richard Yow whom in turn contacted our State Senator, both of whom are advocates of a Mental Court System and have introduced much needed legislation.


#14

They have crisis intervention teams of police for us. Fuck those guys. Get a lawyer. Fuck them hard.

I’ve been arrested but they sent a crisis intervention officer and six other cops. He knew how to deal with a psychotic drunk.


#15

My son is only 20. He has this medical illness because of heredity, not of any fault of his own. He has always been very “accommodating” no matter how “dehumanizing” his intervention team of police have been.


#16

A large factor is if he does not follow instructions of police, if he pisses them off, its not going to go well.

I am a recovered SZ and my symptoms are in remission. I am a small business owner. Yet there was an incident and the local police found out I have SZ, Ever since then my business has dropped by about 50%.

I have always been very cooperative with law enforcement and was never arrested.


#17

I do appreciate your honesty and insight, but I also know, and I’m sure you do as well, that as with any illness’ there are different variations. That being said, my son’s illness is hereditary and has nothing to do with having any ability or inability to follow directions. He has always been very law abiding and has never been involved in any fights etc… when growing up. He was an alpha student, involved in sports etc… This illness engulfed him and literally encased his mind and whole being about three years ago. I have been diligent at being his voice, as his voice is no longer able to be heard.


#18

Note: Moved this item to the Family category where it is more appropriate and more likely to be seen by other caregivers.

Pixel.
(Wearing moderator hat)


#19

Okay. New to the site and am getting acquainted to navigation features. Thanks.


#20

Good job Pixel, yes the family section are more in common, but I would not have posted in that section. What im saying is, the family and care givers should feel welcome in the diagnosed section.