Family and Caregiver Schizophrenia Discussion Forum

Stuck in delusion


#1

My son has been stuck in spiritual delusion since July. He hears spiritual voices. He has been hospitalized and no improvement. He is a different religion each day. He skips meals. He don’t dress. He is consumed by voices.
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#2

I feel very sorry for your son. What he is going through is very frightening for him because he is effectively isolated from the rest of society and he is confused as well. I too have started cutting down on food. I am not doing this by choice, my body doesn’t need as much food as before and I can’t drink alcohol at all now without incurring serious stomach pains the next day. Perhaps this is what is happening in your son’s case. I don’t really know, I am just trying to offer help. I am going through a terrible period in my life which has lasted for 16 months. It has left me very confused. In an attempt to hold on to normality I had hoped to ‘ride it out’, but it is not going away.

Best wishes,
Padster


#3

Has he tried all antipsychotics ?
Has he tried clozaril
Hope he gets better


#4

Thanks for answering. I want to get help and don’t know where to go. The hospital should have kept him. They did not keep trying to help him. I don’t know what to do


#5

Can u get in touch with mental health centre and speak to a nurse
Why hospital let him go?


#6

I feel it is because he is not violent but he still has behaviors. He takes abilify 15 mg. clonazapam 1 mg. invega12 mg lamothigine 200mg 2 times a day lithium 300 mg 3 times a day toprimate. 100 mg at bedtime benzatropine 1 mg twice a day


#7

How long has he been on them?
How long was he in hospital
Usually they keep you in till they get u right


#8

It looks like lamotrigine and topiramate are both anti-convulsants. I think Neurontin is in the same class and has helped my son with anxiety in the past however has anyone ever told you why he is on 2 of them?


#9

He was there dec 1 thru dec 24. The first week he saw the doctor on call. Then they put him on seroquel that he has a history of malignant syndrome. I got them to take him off seroquel . The doctor admitted he did not read history. I hope other people don’t go through the hell I’m living in watching my child need help.


#10

This situation tore at my heart, so I’m going to say something.

I am not a medical doctor, psychologist, or other type of mental health professional or expert. I do have personal experience as a patient who was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia years ago, and within about 3 months was working again, and I’ve lived on my own and worked at well paying, professional jobs for years now with almost no symptoms to speak of. I know what it is like to have a new, bizarre delusion every day for months. Regardless, I don’t give medical advice. I’m going to talk about what I think I would personally do in the situation you describe.

Good grief that sounds like a lot of medication! If it were me, I would not go against doctor’s recommendations on medications, unless you get another, qualified opinion.

However, if someone I loved were on that level of medication, and still had that much in the way of symptoms, I believe I would question whether another mainstream approach might work in this case.

For instance, talk therapy from a licensed psychologist might be considered. The unemployment rate for clinical psychology majors is quite high, so it shouldn’t be too expensive to find a cheap one, frankly.

For another possibility, I know I may draw a lot of heat on this forum for suggesting this; but, even though I’m an agnostic, I sometimes see value in religious beliefs in others. If people really need them, beliefs in mainstream religions, even if they are false or unscientific, may be really helpful to them. If your son is believing new religious delusions every day, maybe he has a deep need to WANT to believe in something, and mainstream religions can fill that need for people who want to believe. Mainstream religious beliefs may be false or unscientific, but they have often been tested on millions of people for thousands of years, and are often safer and more productive in society than personal religious delusions.

So, here is what I’m going to suggest: If I had a son who really seemed to need religious delusion that badly, I might actually seek out an expert, or several experts, in one or more of the mainstream religions to indoctrinate him in the deeper aspects of one of those religions. Some of them have had thousands of years of practice at indoctrinating crazy people, to put it bluntly. With such a belief system in place, he might be able to function fine.

I would probably try the professional psychologist approach first, though. And if I did decide to go the religious route, I would be careful to avoid religious ‘extremists’ or ‘radicals.’ Mainstream would be key.

I sincerely hopes something works for him soon. :frowning: Good luck!


#11

**I just replied to an older post of yours I think!
You are not alone in watching your child go through this–all of us have. It changes your life.
During one period, the hospital my son was in kept releasing him before he was stable. I ended up taking him to the ER every month. The ward there knew my son by then, and would keep him 2 weeks…then after a lot of temper tantrums from me, the case manager would petition a judge to have him comitted to a state hospital–usually for 3 weeks. He would come out of there with a doctors appointment, a case worker and meds. My son would not stay compliant---is not to this day. I guess everyone has to find their way through this ridiculous system since it is different in every city, and not every place has the same resources. It really does suck. My way was to fight every judge, doctor, nurse, etc.....lie if you have to----I dont feel bad about saying that because he should have the help he deserves.
I hope you can get him back into the hospital–anyway you can–so he can get stable, and you can get rest and visit everyday.
I`m with you… **


#12

I wish the hospitals DID keep patients until they got them ‘right’. They keep them only as long as the insurance will pay - that is until they are no longer having acute symptoms that interfere with activities of daily living.

My son hasn’t been symptom free for a long time. The doctor and I keep putting off trying clozaril. I think both of us are hesitant about going to something that can have such serious side effects. Also he was not med-compliant for a long time, so it seems better to stay with something that might not be as effective, but at least he accepts. But sometimes I just feel dismal seeing him so tortured by the voices and paranoia.


#13

I didn’t want to go on ckozaril but been on it ten year now I am more well balanced but still get breakthrough symptoms whic I manage but it’s tough I live alone but have very supportive parents near by
I have bloods every month


#14

Thanks for sharing Shelly. Were you nervous about going on it? My son is on Geodon, not the highest dose tho. Plus Trileptal and cogentin, and that’s it. We tried Invega, but he gained so much weight, the doctor chose to take him off of it.

Oh, DUH, you said you didnt want to go onto it. So - no problems so far other than some breakthrough? My son is living alone again, but I am over there daily for at least a short visit.


#15

Ayes I was nervous but they persuaded me in the end
Feel that I’d be feeling well on a higher dose but they don’t want to help me at the mental health centre as I’m at college and they think I’m ok but I struggle
My mum just been on phone and doesn’t think I should go on more clozaril she says I have to hope they find new drugs be optimistic


#16

It is great you are in college! What are you studying?

(Your mom sounds like me - keeping the hope alive, lol)


#17

I’m studying management
Yes my mum used to be a nurse she is my rock