I need a way to institutionalize my fiancé


#21

Do you have a crisis intervention team where you live?

They might have some ideas. It wouldn’t hurt to ask.


#22

Yes
My going to court and hospitalization happened on the same day.
But the court does have deadlines


#23

If you have guardianship you can likely keep him in the hospital longer. If he goes in and if he talks about the same thing while he’s in there they might hold him longer than three days but there’s really no guarantee.
You will probably have to go in and fill out a mental inquest warrant at your local courthouse. You will have to state why you believe he needs to be in the hospital.
Big hugs


#24

There is, but they weren’t able to do anything last time. I ended up calling the police and he Baker Acted.


#25

Ok, sounds good. How long were you able to keep her in there for?


#26

I don’t have guardianship. Thank you, I wasn’t aware that existed. hugs


#27

From Jan 13, she got discharged just today. She is also under the law to get her monthly shots, which is called “community treatment order” /CTO. If she wont go for the monthly shot, the doctor will send police.
This cto will be in effect for 6 months and then review panel. But the doctor said they usually keep renewing the monthly shots for at least 3 years (every 6 months) I hope this is how it’s going to go

She seems to be back to her normal self except for the stress. But the level of anxiety should go down with the monthly shots

But note: this is in Canada


#28

That’s not helpful. Does he have a caseworker? I think caseworkers pay a lot more attention to details about their clients than doctors. At least that is what I found with my daughter’s caseworker. I think all the caseworkers have been very good and dedicated. Doctors are probably only given 5-10 minutes with their patients and then only see them once a month. That is not enough time to get to know their patients.


#29

Is he taking his meds as prescribed now?

I remember thinking they were giving him a very small dosage of Seroquel and something else.

If they won’t keep him inpatient, maybe you need to find a pdoc who’s more aggressive with the treatment?


#30

That sounds good. I wish there were something like that here.


#31

He doesn’t and I don’t think he would agree to one either.


#32

Yes, they lowered his dose, which isn’t doing much for him. I’m hoping that the doctor changes the medication next time, but my fiancé doesn’t want to and the doctor will only go with his wishes.


#33

The doctor has to work with them to establish trust and a relationship, that’s why they sometimes do things like that.

After all, it’s better to give someone a prescription for 100 mg that they will take than 200 mg that they won’t.

I hope they can find a way to get him to agree to take something else or up the dosage too.

Maybe, they can try him on Zyprexa?
The effective dosage sounds way smaller.
I think the max on Seroquel is around 800/900 mg/day, but Zyprexa is 20/25 mg/day max.
Maybe he’ll be more receptive because it’ll sound like a dosage drop?

Seroquel did nothing for my son, but he’s had times where Zyprexa made a noticeable difference within 24/48 hours. He wasn’t well by any means, but there was clear improvement.

Zyprexa no longer works for my son, but it has been the gold standard for knocking acute psychosis out quickly for a lot of people for a long time.

Maybe a trick with numbers will work long enough for you to get something to happen?


#34

I’ll bring it up at the next meeting, thank you for the suggestion.


#35

Have you looked into “Laura’s Law” New law in the state of California but has not been implemented in all counties. Not knowing your fiancé’s history or what county he resides in, I don’t know if he qualifies or would be eligible but worth taking a look at. There is info online along with the criteria required. I wish you luck and hope you find a way to recovery for him.


#36

Thank you, I don’t reside in California, but I will look into anyway just to get informed.


#37

Sorry - I wasn’t sure…there are different laws in different states. Its always difficult to get someone in for help especially when they don’t believe they need help. I’ve been advocating for my adult son and I admire your willingness to do this for a fiancé its a tough road and you are a true hero for taking this on. I have convinced my son to get help only by making it a condition and requirement to continue living here at my home. Unfortunately, being he isn’t a danger to himself or anyone else I couldn’t get him in anywhere until this upcoming week. So keeping my fingers crossed he still goes and is willing. My local county office for mental health has been a big help providing crisis numbers. NAMI is another great organization that typically have educational courses and support groups for both the consumer and yourself. I wish you luck.


#38

Thank you, I appreciate it. I hope your son follows with his agreement to get help. If allowed, you should get a caseworker to help you out and finding ways for him to recover as an adult. I would get one, but I don’t think he would even talk to them.


#39

You will need guardianship to have a say in his decisions.I am not sure where you are, but in Australia Victoria this involves stating what his disability is with professional evidence and then your son having a say in the matter. An investigator will come to determine if your fears are justified, make a suggestion for further medical assessments, however they can’t force anyone to keep these appointments and then the court makes a decision. This can take time too! Police can do nothing but give advice.


#40

Even if you have guardianship, they have to present as a danger to themselves or others or you have to get a mental inquest warrant and get them picked up.

Once at the hospital, they are watched. Then they can put them on a 72 hour hold but have to go before a judge to keep them longer against their will. This can happen even if they go in voluntarily. I hope this helps.